2013 Golf Croquet Rules – commentary on changes

Commentary on changes in the GC Rules in the 2013 edition

Out of date post – archived.

These Rules are intended for use in all WCF-sponsored competition.  They are also designed to be used by all National Croquet Associations where Golf Croquet is played.  However it is recognised that special conditions will apply in some countries and clubs due to weather, terrain and different traditions.  Such conditions may well be most appropriately dealt with by using local variations in the Rules.

There are minor wording changes in Rule 1, but note:

1(a) The commonly used alternative colours are now mentioned in 1(a).

1(c) now includes when a match ends.

The commentary on 1(c) allows for 2 game matches, which is not the same as a double round robin.

For games played to a 2 point advantage, the commentary suggests that the game stops after a further 6 hoops or when a 2 point advantage is reached.  If after the 6 hoops the game is tied management may choose to break the tie.

The use and application of time limits are a management choice.  The Rule and commentary is deliberately non-prescriptive.

1(d) In the 7 point game the last (7th) hoop is now made by running hoop 1 again. This makes the play to the last hoop similar to that in the 13 and 19 point games in that players turn back to the left for the last hoop.

1(f) has been expanded to cover what happens if both players have been competing for the wrong hoops and at least one wrong hoop has been run.

1(g)  clarifies something already well understood.

The first sentence of the commentary of 1(h) covers the situation where other coloured or marked balls are used in place of the normal or alternative colours.

Rule 2 has been expanded in consultation with the ILC to use the same wording as applies in Association Croquet, where a common rule is appropriate, as the two games are played on the same courts in many places.  Apart from introducing tolerances for court layout, there are no significant changes here.

Rule 3  The Rule has been expanded in consultation with the ILC to use the same wording as applies in Association Croquet, where a common rule is appropriate, as the two games are played on the same courts in many places.  Modifications include:

3(a) introduces tolerances, permission to straighten a leaning peg and the addition of alternative colours on the peg.

3(b) introduces tolerances and permission to straighten a leaning hoop. It also allows for the square topped hoops as used in Egypt.

3(c) leaves the final detailed specification of balls to the tournament management.

3(d) adds detail to mallet specification, but makes no significant changes.

Rule 4 has no significant changes.  A suggestion is made in the commentary, and approval for alternative colours on the peg has been removed to Rule 3(a).

Rule 5 (a) now allows for alternative coloured balls being used at the start.

In a best of 3 or 5 match, Rule 5(c) requires the loser of the previous game to start the next game.

In events played as a double or triple round robin among the same players Rule 5(d) allows the manager to choose to alternate the winning of the toss or to have a fresh toss in each round.

5(e) defines when the game starts.

Ruling 6.1 has been added to Rule 6(a).

The rulings 9.1 and 9.2 have been included in this rule as 6(e) & (f).  Otherwise only clarifying changes have been made.

In Rule 7 a commentary has been added to allow a ball replaced in a hoop after a fault to score from that position.

Ruling 8.1 which offered protection against incorrect information supplied by an opponent has been added as Rule 8(c).

Two new rules dealing with advice from an opponent or spectator have been added.  Rule 14(a)(2) deals with an opponent giving advice, and the Management should deal with spectators giving advice, but in both cases the players being advised should not be penalised when they still had the chance to recognise a change in play themselves. Rules 8(d) & (e) cover this.

A slightly modified Ruling 9.3 is incorporated as Rule 9(g).

Ruling 9.4 was felt to be giving too much advice to the striker, but a modified form appears as 9(h).

Rule 9(j) now allows an emergency lift of a ball to avoid a wayward ball without incurring a non-striking fault.

Defining of the halfway lines has been moved from the diagram to Rule 10(a).  This includes defining the halfway line for hoop 7 in a 7 point game.

To avoid delay, a commentary has been added to Rule 10(b) making it easier to judge whether a ball is off side or not.

The three rulings 10.1, 10.2 and 10.3  have been added to the Rules  10(b)(2), 10(b)(3) and 10(c)(2) respectively.

Rule 1(e) defines which ball is to be played in any turn and who is the striker.  When something else happens Rule 11 now looks at what to do if (b) the striker has not played the striker’s ball  (c) the striker’s partner in doubles has played, or (d) anyone else has played.  These cases cover all situations when the first wrong ball played is noticed.  If more than one wrong ball is played before play is stopped then (e) deals with the case where a player has played an opponent’s ball and the next player plays before it was noticed;  (f) deals with the case where a ball is played in correct sequence after out of sequence play; and (g) deals with a series of wrong ball plays terminated by a wrong ball being noticed or the game ending. A major concern here has been our inability to agree on a method that would prevent ‘gifted’ hoops in all cases, without conferring the ‘gifted hoop’ to the other side.

A minor change to Rule 12(b) has clarified the intent of the rule.

There have been some contradictory ideas about the time when a striking fault may occur ends.  We have adopted here in the commentary to Rule 13 the same approach as that used in Association Croquet, which has the advantage of clarity.

Also 13(a)(10) has been returned to the list of faults.

New wording for Rule 14 (a) makes it clearer that the list of unacceptable behaviours is not exhaustive.

Rule 14(a)(8) introduces a time limit of 1 minute between strokes, with flexibility allowed for hold-ups in play.  The emphasis is still on not wasting time.

Rule 14(a)(13) is intended to penalise players who try to hide lawn damage they have produced.

Rule 14(a)(14) reintroduces the restriction against smoking and drinking alcohol during a game.

Rule 14(b), which deals with this Rule when there is a referee present has been expanded to cover any unacceptable behaviour for a first or subsequent offence.

Rule 14(c), which deals with the very common situation of there being no referee present on the court, seeks to find amicable agreement between the players, calling on a referee only if agreement cannot be found. Common courtesy and sense should prevail and is ultimately in the hands of the management, if the players cannot resolve any issues.

Rule 15 has been reduced because we now have an approved WCF Refereeing Regulation, and so we did not feel it necessary to repeat the issues here.

The major change in Rule 16 is in the allocation of extra turns in Handicap Doubles matches, so that the handicaps of the higher handicapper on each side is compared with the lower handicapper on the other side. See 16(c).  This is intended to allow the extra turns to the higher handicapped player on each side.  The change has been trialled for 3 years in New Zealand and for a shorter time in Australia.  It has meant more doubles play with a senior partner able to help a junior partner develop handicap using skills.

The Appendix that outlines a system for using an automatic handicap system has been replaced by a system based on the one used in New Zealand, as a more complete system.  National Croquet Associations are free to use the system described, to modify it or to replace it if so desired.  At present we have little or no International handicap play, and many countries play no handicap games, so there is little need for a common system.

2015 Business Plan

Introduction

The purpose of this Business Plan is to highlight major items for attention in the year ahead. We re-state our vision, review our strengths and weaknesses, and identify realistic actions which will enable the WCF and croquet to move forward.

Vision

The WCF’s vision, set out in WCF Statutes 103.1 remains valid:

Vision

To make croquet a well-known, well-understood, well-respected and well-supported sport in countries throughout the world.

Assessment of the WCF’s current situation

 

Strengths

 

 

Weaknesses

  • Vibrant event schedule
  • Strong demand from players
  • Increasing number of players in many Members
  • Growing popularity of GC
  • Good financial reserves
  • Ready commitment from Members to host events
  • Active volunteer workforce

 

  • Static Membership
  • Several Members have small and static playing populations
  • Few young players
  • Very limited representation in some regions (Central and South America, parts of Africa   and Asia)
  • WCF events require a great deal of volunteer input, and this can be difficult to muster for some Members

 

Opportunities

 

 

Threats

  • Continue improving relationship with Members
  • Find ways to ramp up development in smaller Members
  • Take the sport to a wider audience through TV
  • Growing “over 50s” world population may expand pool of potential recruits
  • Promote GC as a way to increase the number of young players
  • Attract new Members in regions where there is some form of croquet played
  • Attaining 40 Members is now feasible: may unlock World Games, etc.

 

  • Will the growth in internet gaming reduce the number of young people interested in a sport like croquet?
  • Impact of GC on other codes
  • Gateball may compete for attention and limit our growth
  • Recovery from the Global Financial Crisis is modest and obtaining significant event sponsorship remains difficult

Activities

The work of the WCF falls into four main categories, namely:

  • World Championships
  • Development
  • Communication with Members
  • Administration and finance

1.       WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Completed goals in 2014

  • Held successful AC WTC, Over-50 and Women’s GCWCs in 2014.
  • Completed Event Agreements for Under-21 GCWC, GCWC and Women’s ACWC in 2015.
  • Introduced a new allocation procedure for World Championships.
  • Conducted a trial of the Block Seniority Method for seeding GCWCs.

Goals for 2015

  • Hold successful Under-21 GCWC, GCWC and Women’s ACWC in 2015.
  • Complete Event Agreements for ACWC and GCWTC in 2016 and ACWTC in 2017.
  • Re-run the annual bid process through to 2019.
  • Make permanent decision on seeding GCWCs.
  • Update ‘best practice’ guidance for Event Hosts in light of recent player surveys
  • Create Team Event Regulations including the promotion and relegation policy from Topic 15.

2.       DEVELOPMENT

The main requirements for this important area are:

  • Members coming forward with viable capital grant projects or other development      concepts requiring assistance.
  • Volunteers willing to undertake development work.
  • The provision of an adequate budget.

Completed goals

  • Coaching trips were organised to Germany, Latvia and Switzerland.
  • A plan for future development was formulated.

Goals for 2015

  • Assist Members with recruitment ideas, with particular focus on World Croquet Day in May 2015.
  • Hold another international coaching training course.
  • Arrange further coaching trips to smaller Members.
  • Develop video material, with particular focus on promotional and refereeing videos.
  • Encourage viable projects to develop smaller Members’ facilities, with WCF capital grant assistance if necessary.
  • Investigate countries where some croquet is played and encourage new Members to join.

The fuller development plan for the future is attached as Appendix 1.

3.       COMMUNICATION WITH MEMBERS

A healthy organization ensures that its Members are always fully informed about its activities and plans and, in the case of the WCF, of the current state of the future World Championship programme.

Completed goals

  • The WCF web-site has been maintained.
  • The newsletter to Members has been continued.
  • The 25th anniversary of the WCF was marked by issuing commemorative medals to winners of national championships.

Goals for 2015

  • Implement an improved and easily-administered WCF web-site which is capable of marketing the game as well as discharging its core function of providing essential information about World Championships and how the WCF operates.
  • Make details of consultations and decisions available on the WCF web-site.
  • Continue newsletter to Members.

4.       ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE

The MC and Council have refreshed how they operate. The trial Council e-mail based decision-making process, which is aimed at empowering WCF Members and to make them feel more engaged, better informed and more in control, has been used extensively in 2014. It is proposed to make it permanent and the sole method of Council decision-making.

Completed goals

  • 2013 Financial Review approved and implemented with consequential amendments to Event Regulations, Finance Regulations and Investment Policy.
  • Investments reviewed and improved.

Goals for 2015 and beyond

  • Review and revise Statutes and Management Committee Administration Regulations.
  • Review and rationalize WCF and MC sub-committees.
  • Work with Australia, England, New Zealand and USA to align the roles of the AC International Laws Committee and the WCF GC Rules Committee.
  • Work with the MacRobertson Shield countries to bring the Shield fully within the AC WTC framework while preserving its current governance.
  • Establish a means of reducing the ‘key person’ risk for maintenance of the rankings.
  • Negotiate a long-term agreement for www.croquetscores.com.
  • Observe and analyse effects of new four-year cycle budgeting.
  • Ensure adequate and reliable support for WCF web-site.

The Management Committee

November 2014

Out of date Statutes and Regulations

The documents on this page are OUT OF DATE versions of WCF Regulation and Statutes.

To see the current versions please go to WCF Business > Regulations & Statutes

2014 Business Plan

Introduction

The purpose of this Business Plan is to highlight major items for attention in the year ahead.  We re-state our vision, review our strengths and weaknesses, and identify realistic actions which will enable the WCF and croquet to move forward.

Vision

The WCF’s vision, set out in WCF Statutes 103.1 remains valid, namely “to make Croquet a well-known, well-understood, well-respected and well-supported sport in countries throughout the world”.

Assessment of the WCF’s current situation

Strengths

    • Steadily growing Membership
    • Vibrant events schedule
    • Strong demand from players
    • Growing popularity of Golf Croquet
    • Strong financial reserves
    • Ready commitment from Members to host events
    • Active volunteer workforce

Weaknesses

    • Several Members have small and static playing populations
    • Very limited representation in some regions (Central and South America, parts of Africa and Asia
    • WCF events require considerable volunteer input, and this can be difficult to muster for some Members

Opportunities

    • Continue improving relationship with Members
    • Find ways to ramp up development in smaller Members
    • Take the sport to a wider audience through TV
    • Growing “over 50” world population may expand pool of potential recruits
    • Promote GC as a way to increase the number of young players
    • Attract new Members in regions where there is some form of croquet played
    • Attaining 40 Members is now feasible - may unlock World Games, etc.

Threats

    • Will the growth in internet gaming reduce the number of young people interested in a sport like croquet?
    • Impact of GC on other codes
    • Gateball may compete for attention and limit our growth
    • Recovery from the Global Financial Crisis is modest and obtaining significant event sponsorship remains very difficult

Activities

The work of the WCF falls into four main categories, namely:

    • World Championships
    • Development
    • Communication with Members
    • Administration and finance

1.       WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Completed goals

    • Held a successful GCWC and ACWC in 2013
    • Obtained preferred bidders for all tiers/divisions of 2014 AC WTC
    • Confirmed allocation of teams to tiers/division of World Team Championships
    • Continued regular updating of 10 Year Schedule
    • Completed ‘best practice’ guidance for event hosts.

Continuing goals

    • Confirm new allocation procedure for World Championships
    • Re-run the annual bid process through to 2018
    • Hold successful AC WTC, Over-50s GCWC and Women’s GCWC in 2014
    • Mark the WCF’s 25th Anniversary in 2014.

2.       DEVELOPMENT

The main requirements for this important area are:

Members coming forward with viable capital grant projects or other development concepts requiring funding assistance

    • Volunteers willing to undertake coaching trips
    • Available budget.

Completed goals

    • A coaching trip to India took place in January 2013
    • An international coaching training course was held in England in April/ May 2013
    • Coaching trips were organised to Austria, Germany and Latvia
    • A high-quality film of the 2012 GCWTC is now available.

Continuing goals

    • Assess demand for translations of Laws, Rules and Commentary and undertake pilot of matched-funding as demand requires
    • Encourage viable projects to build the first 4-court venue in a Member’s country, with WCF capital grant assistance
    • Hold another international coaching training course
    • Arrange a further three coaching trips to smaller European members
    • Investigate significant sponsorship opportunities.

3.       COMMUNICATION WITH MEMBERS

A healthy organization ensures that its Members are always fully informed about its activities and plans and, in the case of the WCF, of the current state of the future World Championship programme.

Completed goals

    • The new WCF web-site has been fully implemented
    • The monthly newsletter to Members has become embedded
    • The 10 year Schedule of Events has been updated to 2018.

Continuing goals

    • Implementing reliable webmaster support for the WCF web-site.

4.       ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE

The MC and Council have refreshed how they operate.  The new trial Council decision-making process is aimed at empowering WCF Members, to make them more engaged, better informed and more in control.  The following does not include the business-as-usual activities such as arranging events, accepting entries, financial management and so on.

The WCF has good financial reserves but the recent reduction in event sponsorship has led to a re-examination of the funding the WCF derives from events.

Completed goals

    • 2013 Financial Review approved and implemented with consequential amendments to Event Regulations, Finance Regulations and Investment Policy.

Continuing goals

    • Work with Australia, England, New Zealand and USA to align AC International Laws Committee and WCF GC Rules Committee
    • Learn from the trial Council decision-making trial and consider improvements if necessary
    • Observe and analyse effects of new four-year cycle budgeting
    • Ensure adequate and reliable support for WCF web-site.

The Management Committee

December 2013

John Solomon has died at 82

John Solomon has died at 82

John Solomon, one of croquet’s all-time greats, died last week at 82. He will be remembered as the first croquet “superstar” who, as a young man, provided a desperately needed publicity boost to the game in the fifties when croquet could have shrunk almost to nothing. His international reputation in the sixties was instrumental in encouraging the first competitive croquet between England and the USA.

Despite his huge success in championship and international play, he was ambitious in playing terms, never content just to rely on what he knew would win matches. He is credited with the first ever three-ball triple and the first one-player doubles win at the British Open. Put simply, John Solomon was one of the greatest players ever to hold a mallet. The game owes him a very considerable debt.

Joomla Templates

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Warp Framework

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The Rules of Golf Croquet

The Rules of Golf Croquet

Now out of date – do not use this post. 

 

The Rules of Golf Croquet are published by the WCF Golf Croquet Rules Committee under the auspices of the WCF Council which has the final responsibility for approving changes in the Rules under WCF Statute 107.3.  The terms of reference of the GCRC are set out in WCF Statute 107.4.

The GCRC consists of a representative of each of the five largest GC playing countries and an additional member whi is appointed by the other WCF Members.

The GCRC expects to publish a new edition of the Rules every three or four years.  The current edition is the 4th Edition which the WCF voted to adopted with effect from 23 November 2013.

Members of the WCF Golf Croquet Rules Committee:

 Gordon Smith (chairman)  New Zealand
 Gordon Matthews  Australia
 Georg Dej  Canada (and other WCF Members)
 Amir Ramsis  Egypt
 Tim King  England
 Mohamed Kamal  USA

Introduction to the 2013 Golf Croquet Rules

This follows two years of deliberations by the WCF Golf Croquet Rules Committee on possible changes to the Rules. The prime intention has been to clarify the wording throughout and to produce changes where players have shown concern about some of the Rules. Naturally, not all of the Committee and our advisors have felt the same way about all of the Rules discussed, but we have probably considered nearly every possible variation that would make any sense. It has not been easy, given the wide range of player skill, physical ability and determination, the differences in cultures and the age range of players for whom we are providing an environment. We have arrived at a set of Rules that we believe will be acceptable to most players, without being totally unacceptable to any. We appreciate the efforts made by those of our respondents who contributed suggestions for improvements to the draft Rules.

The 2013 Rules of Golf Croquet can be found at 2013 Golf Croquet Rules

A commentary on the changes in the 2013 Edition can be found at 2013 Golf Croquet Rules – commentary on changes

The 2015 Official Rulings to be applied to the 2013 Rules can be found at 2013 Golf Croquet Rules – current Official Rulings

 

2015 GCWC – Qualifying Tournament

2015 Golf Croquet World Championship Qualifying Tournament

  • Dates: Tuesday, 3 to Thursday 5 February 2015
  • Venues: Morrinsville Croquet Club and Claudelands (Hamilton) Croquet Club
  • Headquarters: Morrinsville Croquet Club

    Manager:         Joan Jenkin, 110A Studholme St, Morrinsville, New Zealand

                            Tel: (07) 889 6789

                            E-mail: joanjenkin@gmail.com

 

        Asst. Mgr:      Geoff Young, 202A Tower Rd, Matamata, New Zealand

                               Tel: (07) 888 4995

                              E-mail: geoffyoung@xnet.co.nz

Entries may be sent to either the Manager or Assistant Manager Entry Fee: NZ$60

Conditions

  1. Entries close with the Managers on Monday 19th January 2015.
  2. Places may be limited. Entries will be accepted in grade order up to 7th December 2014 and thereafter in order of application.
  3. Overseas players may pay entry on arrival at tournament.
  4. The top four players will be awarded places in the Golf Croquet World Championship.